Indigenous Perspectives Society

IN Perspective

IN Perspective – Spring 2019

The Spring 2019 IN Perspective is out and available to read here. This season’s newsletter features the following:

  • Executive Update
  • IPS Updates
  • Gladue Report Training
  • Cultural Perspectives Training
  • Training Calendar

Spring 2019 IN Perspective

Sign up to receive our quarterly edition of IN Perspective using the sign up feature at the bottom right corner of this page.

If you have any questions about IN Perspective or would like to have your articles, poetry, photos, news or events posted in our next newsletter send us an email using the contact page on our website. *Submissions included at the editor’s discretion.

Organizational Excellence: A Professional Development Event June 5 & 6

https://ipsregistration.ca

Join us for 2 days of professional development workshops on June 5 & 6,. Leaders in the field will help you and your staff expand their skills and bring new expertise to your workplace.

June 5, 2019 8:30 am – 4:00 pm (includes lunch)

Day 1 – Morning

  • Wellness and Stress – Zhila Alizadeh-Borji
  • Conflict Resolution – Moussa Magassa

Day 1 – Afternoon

  • HR Law – Mark Hundelby
  • Multiple Project Management – Lee Herrin

June 6, 2019 8:30 am – 1:00 pm (includes lunch)

Day 2 – Morning

  • Proposal Writing – Armando Jardim
  • Going Above and Beyond – Ruth A. Mojeed

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Day 2 – Afternoon Bonus workshop

  • Navigating IConnect and the ICM ­- Chris Choo

Location – Indigenous Perspectives Society
664 Granderson Rd
Victoria BC, V9B 2R8

Early bird Special: $350.00 (closes May 1, 2019)
Regular registration rate $375.00
Student Rate: $250.00
(Deadline for refunds is May 1, 2019)

For participants traveling from out of town and needing accommodation, here is the reservation link you and your guests can use to book our event group rate:

 

Indigenous Child Protection Training Manager

Indigenous Perspectives Society is a provincial organization that provides professional development to Indigenous child and family services in BC. Unique to our organization, is our commitment to culturally relevant services. The Society works in cooperation with First Nations and Indigenous child and family service programs to protect and enhance the well-being of First Nations and Aboriginal people by reaffirming traditions, and through effective child and family service delivery that empower the voices of Indigenous peoples.

Position Summary:

Indigenous Perspectives Society (IPS) is seeking an Indigenous Child Protection Training Manager who is ultimately responsible for ensuring exceptional delivery of training with content that is both relevant and timely which includes training scheduling and evaluations.  The position will include overseeing the development of curriculum and facilitation techniques to ensure course material is aligned with child welfare legislation and other internal policies.  The Indigenous Child Protection Training Manager will lead a high performing team (10) of Project Leads, Instructional Staff, relevant Administrative employees and Contractors.

The Indigenous Child Protection Training Manager reports to the Associate Director (AD) and will develop strong relationships with IPS staff, various stakeholders such as the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) and Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), and contractors.  The position will be based out of the Society’s office and will be expected to do some travel (mostly in BC) to other off-site locations and represent IPS at various conferences, committees and forums.

Ideal Experience:

  • A Masters of Social Work or related degree such as Psychology, Education or Child Services
  • 5-7 years’ experience in Child Welfare related field or an equivalent combination of education and experience
  • Progressive experience in Indigenous Child & Family Services, child protection and Indigenous social work
  • Demonstrated experience in the design and development of competency-based curriculum, public education and relations materials, specifically utilizing a blended learning approach
  • Experience in adult education instruction
  • Sound knowledge of Indigenous communities, cultures, traditions and practices in BC
  • Proficiency with computer software including MS Office, Moodle and PowerPoint
  • Preference will be given to individuals identifying as Indigenous, Metis or Inuit

 Interested? Apply directly to Rachelle Dallaire with your resume and cover letter, telling us about your stellar skills and why you’d be the perfect fit for the IPS team! No personal drop-ins or phone calls please.

Indigenous Perspective Society thanks all applicants for their interest and advises that only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

For this and other employment opportunities at Indigenous Perspectives Society visit https://ipsociety.ca/about/employment/ 

IN Perspective – Winter 2018/19

The Winter 2018/19 IN Perspective is out and available to read here. This season’s newsletter features the following:

  • Executive Update
  • Message from the Representative for Children and Youth
  • Gladue Report Training
  • Cultural Perspectives Training
  • Training Calendar

Winter 2018/19 IN Perspective

Sign up to receive our quarterly edition of IN Perspective using the sign up feature at the bottom right corner of this page.

If you have any questions about IN Perspective or would like to have your news or event posted in our next newsletter send us an email using the contact page on our website.

What does Indigenous look and sound like?

 

With the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action and both the governments of Canada and British Columbia adopting the United Nations’ Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, more people are wanting to ‘Indigenize’ their work with images and voices to reflect the new way of seeing presented through reconciliation efforts. Considering the diversity of Indigenous Peoples in Canada, this process has raised the question, “What does Indigenous look and sound like?”

In my position at Indigenous Perspectives Society (IPS), I have interviewed many individuals, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous. When interviewing Indigenous applicants, it has been my experience that they come from a range of cultural backgrounds and immersion. Some have been raised in traditional families with cultural teachings, values, and experiences. For others, many have been displaced from family and cultural rearing by the child welfare system, and some never taught their culture out of shame instilled by the dominant mainstream society and colonization.  The gift offered by these varied experiences is a diversity in the stories shared by applicants.

In one interview, an Indigenous applicant in her introduction of herself shared the words “I know I don’t look Indigenous.” While I did not say anything in the moment, at the end of the interview when I provided her feedback I shared with her that when she identifies as an Indigenous woman, to do so with pride and unapologetically. Having said this, it did get me to thinking that this was not my first experience with an Indigenous candidate who felt the need to explain why they did not look a certain way. I hold the Canadian government, our mainstream stereotypes, as well lateral violence in Indigenous communities responsible for this.

With the implementation of the Indian Act in Canada, the Canadian government exploited Indigenous identities by dictating that the government and the government alone was the only body that could confirm whether an individual was in fact an Indigenous person. With this colonial exercise came mainstream and societal expectations and the stereotypical practice that an Indigenous person ought to look a certain way so that they could be easily identifiable.

Worse yet, these societal stereotypes found their way into Indigenous communities whereby community members then resented their counterparts who didn’t quite look like them. Skin being dark enough, hair straight enough and linguistic patterns became a way to separate and divide Indigenous communities.

We know that Indigenous looks and sounds differently depending which nation, group, or community you are part of. We also know that heritage and blood lines contribute to what Indigenous looks like. In the spirit of reconciliation, I encourage non-Indigenous allies to honour self-identification and to remember that Indigenous can look and sound as diverse as anyone in the world.

Rachelle Dallaire, Executive Director, Indigenous Perspectives Society