Indigenous Perspectives Society

IN Perspective

What I learned in Cultural Perspectives Training

LocationEven though I thought I already had a good understanding of our collective history from university studies, Indigenous friends, living and working with First Nations, life experiences and relationships, my knowledge was assembled in pieces over time. Sitting down for a full day of in-class focused study in Cultural Perspectives Training (CPT) to review our history of colonization really synthesized that knowledge, filled in some important gaps, and deepened my emotional connection the importance of acknowledging our past and the need for each one of us to take action to reconcile.

Here are 3 valuable perspectives that I (re)learned in CPT:

1.   The importance of cultural location. Where we come from builds the foundation of who we are and how we think. By locating ourselves in relationship to one another, we can have a better understanding of what we bring our relationships. In many Indigenous cultures, introductions include family and geography. This is important because it links us to our place in our natural ecology. For example, here is my introduction, “My name is Alesha Doran. My mother is Aleta Leopas and my father is David Hayes. My parents settled in Canada in 1974, coming from Northern California. My ancestors are primarily from Scotland, Sweden, England, and Estonia.” Being open and honest about how you arrived where you are, not only helps others in relationship to you, it reminds you of your own perspective in relationship to those around you.

2.   The insidious nature of institutionalized racism, specifically the Indian Act. In Cultural Perspectives Training we study how Canadian legislation classifies Indigenous people and the impacts of that classification in community and family cultures. We also look at how the Indian Act, while a tool of segregation, is an acknowledgement of traditional claim to territory. To have it removed without replacement agreements in place threatens to remove legal land rights. This unfortunate circumstance is why many Indigenous communities are opposed to having it revoked, even though its enforcement has caused so much harm.

3.   The social consequences of intergenerational trauma. Intergenerational trauma is not exclusively an Indigenous issue, it is a consequence of multiple generations of poverty that occur in every community to some degree. Poverty is not restricted to finance, it includes economic, cultural, emotional and educational scarcity that can lead to various types of abuse and neglect. Because of the extreme actions taken against Indigenous populations during the colonization of Canada, the consequences of that trauma still deeply effects individuals and communities. Respect, support and understanding are imperative to practice as these are wounds we all share.

Cultural Perspectives Training Certificate - Alesha Doran-1These are only three of many perspectives that unfold during the day of Cultural Perspectives Training, with learning deepening as ideas are reinforced through discussion and practice during the following 8 hours of online study distributed over 4 weeks. Understanding where we come from, and our role in Canada’s colonization history, gives each of us powerful self-awareness tools that enable us to be truly present to one another.

Indigenous Perspectives Society will be offering another session of Cultural Perspectives Training on February 28, 2017. To register visit https://ipsociety.ca/cultural-competency-training/cptraining/

About the Author

Alesha Doran is the Business Development Coordinator for the Indigenous Perspectives Society – Creating Excellence through Training and Leadership. A non-indigenous ally, Alesha was born and raised in Secwepemc territory and now enjoys life in beautiful Lkwungen territory on southern Vancouver Island. For more information on Cultural Perspectives Training email her at aleshad@ipsociety.ca and visit www.ipsociety.ca

Button Blanket Project Launches With An Abundance Of Community Support

 

Buton Blanket Project

 

Indigenous Perspectives Society’s Button Blanket Project began today with an outpouring of community support not held back by the rainy weather.

“We are honoured to host the button blanket project here at Indigenous Perspectives Society on the traditional territory of the Songhees, Esquimalt and Beecher Bay First Nations,” said Linda Lucas, Indigenous Perspectives Society Executive Director. “We are supporting this project to build community relationships in the spirit of Reconciliation.”

The Society’s button blanket project is a 10-week creative journey of Reconciliation sponsored by the Anglican Church to bring community together and honour our collective commitment to a new way of being in relationship to each other.

“I am grateful and humbled to have been chosen to develop artwork that will bring a community together. A community that will create a beautiful and meaningful art piece in the button blankets, and all the while, learning of each other, of culture and of Reconciliation,” said Darrell Thorne, Coast Salish Artist. “I raise my hands and thank Indigenous Perspectives Society for this opportunity.”

IPS will sew four button blankets with images of Whale, Eagle, Raven, and Wolf that when completed will hang on the walls of the IPS training room as symbols of our dedication to Reconciliation.

“I’m so excited for this opportunity to build relationships through creativity and art,” said Becky Miller, University of Victoria Environmental Studies Graduate Student. “What an honour to partake in Indigenous culture; thank you for hosting such a welcoming event! I am new to British Columbia and look forward to meeting new members of my community.”

Indigenous Perspectives Society (IPS) is a charitable and not-for-profit social enterprise that offers training programs and services that help foster a deeper understanding of Indigenous perspectives, cultural differences, and the need for self-determination. By creating excellence through training and leadership, we help strengthen lives and build successful relationships in our communities.

Beginning with a focus on Indigenous child and family service delivery through the CARF International accredited Aboriginal Social Work training series, IPS has grown to include Cultural Perspectives Training, Adoption Online, Recruitment and Retention of Indigenous People, and more. By creating excellence though training and leadership, IPS has been supporting communities throughout British Columbia and across Canada for more than 22 years.

To learn more about Indigenous Perspectives Society visit https://ipsociety.ca/

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Attached Photo: Second from left, Darrell Thorne, fourth from left, Laurie MacDonald, and Becky Miller.

Media Contacts:

Laurie MacDonald, 250 391 0007 ext. 223

Barbara Smith, 250 391 0007 ext. 247

 

Button Blanket Project Opening Ceremony

 

Button Blanket Opening

 

You are invited to the opening ceremony of Indigenous Perspectives Society’s Button Blanket Project, a 10-week creative journey of Reconciliation sponsored by the Anglican Church to bring community together and honour our collective commitment to a new way of being in relationship to each other.

Date: January 17, 2017

Time: 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

Location: Indigenous Perspectives Society, 644 Granderson Road, Langford, B.C.

Event Details: Our opening event will include storytelling, elder blessings, and food sharing as we begin this creative journey together.

From January 17 to March 21, IPS will sew four button blankets with images of Whale, Eagle, Raven, and Wolf that when completed will hang on the walls of the IPS training room as symbols of our dedication to Reconciliation.

Indigenous Perspectives Society (IPS) is a charitable and not-for-profit social enterprise that offers training programs and services that help foster a deeper understanding of Indigenous perspectives, cultural differences, and the need for self-determination. By creating excellence through training and leadership, we help strengthen lives and build successful relationships in our communities.

Beginning with a focus on Indigenous child and family service delivery through the CARF International accredited Aboriginal Social Work training series, IPS has grown to include Cultural Perspectives Training, Adoption Online, Recruitment and Retention of Indigenous People, and more. By creating excellence though training and leadership, IPS has been supporting communities throughout British Columbia and across Canada for more than 22 years.

To learn more about Indigenous Perspectives Society visit https://ipsociety.ca/

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Media Contacts:

Laurie MacDonald, 250 391 0007 ext. 223

Barbara Smith, 250 391 0007 ext. 247

Message from the Acting Representative for Children and Youth

 

Bernard RichardHello everyone, and thank you for this opportunity to introduce myself. My name is Bernard Richard and I am B.C.’s new Acting Representative for Children and Youth – “acting” until the Legislature meets in February and holds a vote on my appointment. I am truly honoured to be here and am looking forward to building upon the important work of my predecessor, Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond.

First, a bit about me. I have a background in law and social work and am from the small fishing village of Cap Pelé in New Brunswick. I also have a background in government. I served as a member of New Brunswick’s Legislative Assembly from 1991 to 2003, and have held several cabinet portfolios. Most directly related to this position, I was appointed New Brunswick’s first Child and Youth Advocate in 2006 and I am passionate about working in support of child and youth rights.

A key issue for me – and one upon which I plan to focus my attention – is reducing the high number of Indigenous children and youth in care in British Columbia. The numbers are highly troubling, and I believe it is vitally important that children retain strong connections to their extended families, cultures and natural environments. I’m also deeply concerned about child and youth mental health, the rights of children and youth and advocacy for those rights, and will be making these priority areas as well.

Finally, I am eager to get out and meet as many of you as I can over the coming months. It’s important to me to meet those in B.C. who are working towards the same goals. I know that you share my passion for supporting B.C.’s children and youth, and I am looking forward to connecting with you.

In the meantime, remember, our advocates are here for children, youth and their families.  Call us at 1-800-476-3933 or email us at rcy@rcybc.ca  And don’t forget, if you are receiving or eligible to receive CLBC services, we can advocate for you until your 24th birthday.

‘Til next time,

Bernard Richard

Acting Representative for Children and Youth, British Columbia

IN Perspective – Winter 2016

The Winter 2016 IN Perspective is out and available to read here. This season’s newsletter features the following articles:

    • Executive Update
    • Holiday Arts & Crafts Fair
    • Cultural Perspectives Training
    • BLOOMM Update
    • Working In A Non-Profit
    • Button Blanket Project
    • New Staff
    • Training Update

Winter 2016 IN Perspective

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